What Role Do Habits Play in Addiction?

Addiction is more than simply a bad habit, but habit plays a strong role in addiction development and continuation. The New York Times explains, “Addiction is brought about by the repeated pursuit of highly attractive goals and corresponding inattention to alternative goals.” Getting high on an opiate like morphine or getting drunk is often an attractive goal at first, as the reward system is stimulated by substances. Alternative goals that do not create the same rush of pleasure or...

A History of Morphine Use and Addiction

Morphine is a narcotic painkiller, so it has an important role in medicine. The Encyclopedia Britannica shares that “morphine is among the most important naturally occurring compounds, being of use in the treatment of pain caused by cancer and in cases where other analgesics have failed. It also has a calming effect that protects the system against exhaustion in traumatic shock, internal hemorrhage, congestive heart failure, and debilitated conditions.” This drug is a staple of modern...

Differences Between Side Effects of Morphine and Addiction Symptoms

Morphine is a natural compound in opium poppy plants. It made history as the first natural alkaloid to be isolated when a German pharmacist created it in 1804. The following decade it was marketed as a medication, and two centuries later it remains one of the most effective and addictive painkillers available. Morphine works by binding to opioid receptors in the central nervous system to reduce nerve impulse transmissions. This same alkaloid is used to make heroin, which should epitomize its...

Can Morphine Interact with my Anti-Depressant?

Using anti-depressants along with morphine often causes many problems. One of the most common effects of combining the two substances is respiratory depression, which makes it difficult to breathe. Anti-depressants and morphine are both central nervous system (CNS) depressants, which typically causes them to have synergistic effects. These two substances have an enhanced effect on the CNS to cause respiratory depression, meaning that too little oxygen is being inhaled, and that not enough...

Origins of Morphine

Understanding addiction and the effects drug abuse can have on users may require more than simply knowing which drug a user is abusing. Some drugs, such as morphine, have been used for hundreds of years, so knowing the drug’s history can help you understand its effects on society and what leads a person to abuse it. The more you know about a drug, the more aware you will become of the risks involved in drug abuse. Morphine has been used for hundreds of years and for just as long people have...

Is Morphine Abuse Changing?

Although the pain blocking and intoxicating effects of opium had been known for centuries, its derivative morphine was first crystallized in 1805. For over 200 years it has remained a sort of benchmark drug in the treatment of acute and chronic pain and has ensnared millions of people with its addictive properties. While the way the drug is used, and abused, have changed significantly in recent years, the underlying potential for both relief and abuse remain much the same. What Is Morphine? The...

Three Dangerous Complications of Morphine Abuse

Morphine is a very addictive drug. Although it is one of the most powerful painkillers, it has the addictive powers of heroin. Morphine can help patients get rid of pain while providing a pleasurable and often euphoric feeling. When taken without medical supervision, morphine abuse can lead to serious morphine addiction. There are several different ways in which a painkiller addiction can socially, psychologically, emotionally and physically destroy an individual. Morphine addiction is no...

4 Surprising Facts About Morphine Addiction

Morphine is a naturally occurring substance found in the Asian poppy plant. It has been used for over 6000 years as a way to treat pain and for its euphoric effects. Morphine is highly habit forming. Using the drug recreationally or in larger amounts or for longer periods of time than prescribed by a physician can lead to addiction. Morphine is an opioid pain reliever and changes the way the brain perceives pain. Morphine acts on the opioid receptors in the brain and central nervous system. It...

Unexpected Side Effects of Morphine Use

Most individuals are aware of the risks of addiction that come with morphine abuse. They may even know about common side effects, such as constipation, headaches and dizziness. Additionally, they may even know about more dangerous side effects, such as trouble breathing and a reduced heart rate. However, the wanted and unwanted effects of drug abuse don’t always appear as expected, so unusual or uncommon responses to the drug can occur even in experienced morphine users. Ending morphine...

Demographic Influences on Morphine Abuse

Many people do not know that morphine can be abused for a powerful high, but morphine abuse and addiction is highly prevalent, especially among Caucasians who suffer from chronic pain. Morphine can be injected or taken orally, and many people abuse it to relieve chronic pain from physically demanding jobs, such as construction work. Demographics play a significant role in who abuses morphine and why, but professional treatment is available to help users get and stay clean. Morphine Abuse...

Morphine Abuse in Africa

Morphine is a relatively cheap drug, but that does not mean it is within the budgets of many individuals living in poverty. In a 2013 article entitled “Morphine Kills Pain but Its Price Kills Patients,” Inter Press Service News Agency reports that in Zimbabwe a bottle of 60 ten-milligram morphine pills costs the equivalent of 18 loaves of bread. Many African countries like Zimbabwe have unemployment rates of well over 50 percent, and such a steep price makes the drug inaccessible to those...

The Relationship between Homelessness and Morphine Addiction

According to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, homelessness is defined as lacking a fixed nighttime residence adequate for basic human needs. Living in shelters, transitional housing, abandoned buildings, bus stations and public areas all qualify as being homeless. The 1997 Addiction-published study “Substance Abuse and Homelessness” examined the two issues through two social models, which included the following: Social selection – Substance abuse is a pathway that...

Morphine Use on College Campuses

Morphine is a powerful narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. It is frequently used to treat postoperative pain and to provide quick and temporary relief of severe acute pain following an injury. In the process of blocking physical pain signals in the brain, however, morphine also blocks any negative emotions or psychological disorders, including the following: Depression Loneliness Anxiety disorders Self-esteem problems Insecurity Compulsive behaviors Morphine gives users a euphoric...

Morphine Abuse Rates in Australia

Used to treat severe pain, morphine is a prescription drug derived from the same plants as heroin. Because the drug is a narcotic, many people use it recreationally, a practice that can easily cause an addiction. According to the International Narcotics Control Board report for 2012, cannabis and amphetamine-type stimulants remain the most commonly abused drugs in Australia, but abuse of opiates like morphine remains a sizable problem. Australia The Australian Institute of Criminology’s...

Morphine Abuse in Asian Countries

As early as the 8th Century, opium began in Asian countries such as China, Vietnam, Myanmar and Malaysia. In the 16th Century, European merchants discovered the commercial appeal of opium, and began distributing it throughout the continent. Although historically opiate abuse was a minor problem throughout this area, drug use in urban areas has been rising since the 1960’s to today. Recent open door policies for international trade have also increased the use and availability of illicit drugs,...

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