Preventing an Emotional Relapse Before a Physical Relapse

Physical relapse is easy to define and identify—it is the act of taking drugs when you have previously been in rehab. However, emotional relapse is a little more difficult to define and identify. Emotional relapse is the first phase that often leads to physical relapse. In emotional relapse you are not yet thinking about using drugs (that’s the second phase leading to relapse), but your emotions and feelings are in a state that could lead you to relapse. In emotional relapse you feel...

Replacing Morphine Abuse with a Healthy Activity

Morphine addiction is a powerful physical and mental disease. This drug, which is chemically related to heroin and opium, changes the way the brain works. Recovery requires comprehensive treatment that unravels the many layers of the disease and establishes new, healthy, patterns and habits. Several successful treatment facilities offer specialized programs that help their clients replace morphine abuse with positive, constructive activities that promote health and wellness. Morphine and...

Does the Subjective Nature of Pain Increase the Risk of Addiction?

When a patient enters a doctor’s office complaining of pain, he or she is often asked to describe the type of pain and rate its severity from zero to 10, with 10 being the most severe. These self-identified levels can help doctors identify pain, pain causes and course of treatment, but they are often the only source of pain evaluation given or available to patients. As Nancy Neff at the University of Texas at Austin explains, “It is surprisingly difficult to describe how pain feels...

Morphine and Pregnancy

Pregnant women should not use morphine unless it is prescribed to them by a doctor. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—the government agency that protects public health by ensuring that food, drugs, and other products are safe for consumption—considers morphine a pregnancy category C substance. This category simply means that, although the effects of morphine on pregnancy have not been thoroughly researched, there are many risks that cannot be ruled out. As a result, the FDA recommends...

Morphine Abuse and Brain Injuries

Substance abuse plays a huge role in the formation and treatment of brain injuries. Drugs disrupt the brain’s chemical balance, its way of communicating and its functioning, and it impairs users, so it significantly increases the chances of brain injury. For instance, morphine abuse can indirectly lead to an accident or injury that harms the brain, or it can directly cause chemical harm to the brain’s structure, so damage may occur. People who sustain traumatic brain injuries may have drug...

Why Does Withdrawal from Morphine Make You Sick?

Morphine is a powerful painkiller that has been used to treat moderate to severe pain, such as that which follows surgery or injury, for over a century. It is highly effective but also carries a significant risk of abuse and dependence. Withdrawal from morphine can be extremely uncomfortable and even life threatening. What Is Morphine Dependence? The brain uses a complex and intricate system of chemical responses to send various signals throughout the central nervous system. When a person...

What Morphine Does to Your Brain Chemistry

Any drug you take will affect your body. Some drugs speed up the central nervous system, and other drugs slow it down. Some drugs heighten your attention, while others make you drowsy or sleepy. Even prescription drugs have side effects, which is why you should only take them under the direction of a physician. When you take morphine, it interferes with the brain’s activity, specifically its neurotransmitters, neurons and the receptors. In other words, morphine changes the brain’s chemical...

Three Dangerous Complications of Morphine Abuse

Morphine is a very addictive drug. Although it is one of the most powerful painkillers, it has the addictive powers of heroin. Morphine can help patients get rid of pain while providing a pleasurable and often euphoric feeling. When taken without medical supervision, morphine abuse can lead to serious morphine addiction. There are several different ways in which a painkiller addiction can socially, psychologically, emotionally and physically destroy an individual. Morphine addiction is no...

How Morphine Affects Your Eating Habits and Appetite

A common resolution people make on New Year’s Day is to lose weight. Weight loss is a booming industry in the US and all over the world, so the desire to trim fat off of one’s physique is becoming more are more encouraged. Unfortunately, some people seek dangerous ways to lose weight. Along that same line, some people lose weight and change their body chemistry without being aware of it, especially due to the use or abuse of certain substances. For instance, morphine can affect eating...

Physical Complications of Abusing Morphine

Morphine is a narcotic opiate that weakens pain signals that reach the brain. When prescribed by a physician, it usually treats moderate to severe pain, often before and after surgical procedures. However, people often abuse morphine, because it produces euphoria. Unfortunately, morphine abuse is a growing problem in the US: a 2011 article from the National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that 5.1 million people abused painkillers like morphine in 2010. Because morphine is prescribed by a...

The Danger of Thinking You Can Use Morphine Just One More Time

Once a rehab program ends or before one begins, many people want to bid farewell to their drug with one last use. Unfortunately, a long “goodbye” to morphine can quickly become a dangerous “hello” to destruction. Seek help to get and stay clean from morphine abuse. Consequences of Morphine Abuse before Rehab Begins If you have committed to a rehab program but have not yet entered it, you may fear the challenges ahead of you. You may want to use drugs to soothe your...

Plastic Surgery and Morphine Addiction

Many people undergo plastic surgery to feel more confident, look younger and even to resolve health issues, but it can be painful and involve intense recovery. Because recovery from surgery is a painful and difficult phase, many patients receive a morphine prescription to help them manage pain. Morphine is useful, but it also poses risks to each patient. Classified as a narcotic, it is an opiate painkiller that produces a euphoric high, and it is also addictive. Morphine addiction has wrecked...

Chronic Back Pain and Morphine Addiction

Chronic back pain can be a miserable and debilitating condition, so to treat it some people take a painkiller. While morphine helps many people control their pain, many people become addicted to the drug alongside their pain. If you struggle with both chronic back pain and morphine addiction, then seek professional help to manage both conditions. Risks of Morphine Addiction for People with Chronic Back Pain Alarming statistics and celebrity cases have helped publicize the seriousness of...

Autoimmune Disorders and Morphine Addiction

There are hundreds of different autoimmune disorders that impact individuals worldwide. These types of disorders include cancer, diabetes, lupus, and psoriasis, causing an individual to experience physical and emotional pain that can lead to the development of an addiction problem. In many cases, individuals who are battling an autoimmune disorder often turn to strong drugs, such as morphine, to help cope with emotional distress and manage the pain they are experiencing. How Can Autoimmune...

STDs and Morphine Addiction

There is a connection between sexually transmitted diseases and drug addiction, but many people think the connection comes only from sharing needles during drug use. While morphine addicts should know that they could contract a disease in this way, it is not the only way morphine abuse can lead to an STD. Get help today for these dangerous issues. How Morphine Abuse Leads to STDs People can take morphine as a pill or a liquid that they inject. The injectable form produces results more quickly,...

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