Mental Discipline and Healthy Thinking

No matter what public opinion might say, addiction is a disease, not the product of poor discipline, poor morals or a lack of willpower. However, when it comes to recovery, discipline and willpower matter greatly, as they help people think healthily and pursue healthier lives. Luckily, anyone can develop these skills through therapy and healthy thinking. In fact, Psychology Today emphasizes that “It’s not your fault that you have this disease, but it is your responsibility to manage the...

EMDR’s Use in Non-Combat Trauma

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) has become a nearly standard component of treatment for combat-related trauma. However its proven effectiveness does not end with combat-related trauma. Trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) result from a variety of causes and sources, and regardless of the source, EMDR can be an important element of treatment and recovery. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has approved EMDR as an evidence-based...

What to Do When You Feel Like You Have Two Brains

Addiction can leave you feeling torn. On one hand you see the consequences of drug use and don’t want to use. On the other, you don’t know how to stop and don’t know if you really want to. You see the effects of morphine, oxycodone and other opiates can have on your life, and you want those consequences to end. You want to heal relationships with family, reestablish your physical health, remove the stress, pressure and pain of addiction and find a new, normal life. However you...

Preventing an Emotional Relapse Before a Physical Relapse

Physical relapse is easy to define and identify—it is the act of taking drugs when you have previously been in rehab. However, emotional relapse is a little more difficult to define and identify. Emotional relapse is the first phase that often leads to physical relapse. In emotional relapse you are not yet thinking about using drugs (that’s the second phase leading to relapse), but your emotions and feelings are in a state that could lead you to relapse. In emotional relapse you feel...

Why Is Controlling My Emotions So Important in Rehab?

Attending rehab is about regaining control of your life, and that extends beyond addiction alone. While substance abuse is the main issue you are facing, in order to successfully beat addiction, you must understand and address the underlying issues that drive you to abuse morphine. All users have triggers or things that lead them to abuse drugs. Losing control of your emotions is a common struggle for people suffering from addiction. When you lose control of your emotions, you may feel...

Taking Inventory of Your Morphine Use: How Is it Affecting You?

Not everyone recognizes the effects of morphine use in his or her life. Sometimes, becoming dependent on drugs is a slow process and the changes that take place in your life may be so incremental that it is difficult to see how your morphine use is affecting you. However, using morphine will affect every aspect of your life, including your physical health, your relationships with others, your career and your emotional health. Physical Inventory As you take morphine on a continual basis, you...

Can Morphine Worsen Depression?

Morphine is a potent painkiller that treats moderate to severe pain. The drug comes in short-acting tablets and liquids, as well as sustained-release tablets and capsules. It works by binding to receptors in the brain and central nervous system to reduce the perception of pain and responses to itBecause morphine slows down the central nervous system, it is particularly dangerous when taken with other drugs (such as alcohol, sedatives, muscle relaxers and sleeping pills) that can cause problems...

Is Depression the Root of Morphine Abuse?

Discussing the cause and effects of morphine abuse and addiction can often wind up sounding like the classic “chicken and egg” conundrum. Many people, in their search for understanding, spend excessive energy contemplating why they have a drug problem instead of focusing on overcoming it. The fact is though, that a severe emotional illness such as depression can significantly increase the likelihood that a person will become addicted to a drug like morphine. While depression is certainly...

Can Morphine Cause a Mental Health Relapse?

Morphine treats moderate to severe pain. Along with heroin and other opiates, it is often prescribed for people with cancer or terminal illnesses. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the central nervous system: once there, it reduces both perceptions and emotional responses to pain. Morphine is a highly potent drug. When properly administered through a health-care provider, it is safe and helpful; but, when abused it can quickly trigger an addiction. The euphoria it creates causes the...

Morphine and Sleep Disorders

Morphine is a drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. Along with heroin and other opiate analogues, it is often prescribed for people with cancer or terminal illnesses. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and central nervous system. Once there, it reduces both perceptions of and emotional responses to pain. Morphine is a highly potent drug. When properly administered through a healthcare provider, it is safe and helpful. When abused, it can trigger the onset of an addiction...

Dependent Personality Disorder and Addiction Help

Morphine addicts with dependent personality disorder find life extremely complicated and overwhelming.  This may be due in part to the fact that most treatment facilities address either addiction or mental illness, so they send patients back and forth between offices for treatment. However, for patients to recover from both their addictions and personality disorders, they need comprehensive treatment for both issues at the same time. What Is Dependent Personality Disorder? Personality...

Can Morphine Cause Personality Disorders?

A personality disorder is a mental illness that motivates extreme behaviors counter to widely accepted social norms. There are several types of personality disorders with varying symptoms and characteristics, as outlined below: Antisocial – Manipulative, exploitative and dishonest Avoidant – Socially phobic and terrified of rejection Borderline – Unstable, explosive and intense Narcissistic – Self-consumed and egotistical Obsessive-Compulsive – Anxious preoccupation with...

Can Morphine Affect My Memory?

Medical professionals often prescribe morphine when treating intense pain, because it is an extremely potent opiate painkiller. Additionally, doctors also prescribe it to relieve fear and anxiety, because it also produces a strong sense of euphoria. Some people abuse morphine simply for the euphoria, but this kind of drug use can quickly turn into an addiction with complicated physical, emotional and behavioral problems. Morphine Abuse Effects The physical effects of morphine abuse include the...

How Morphine Abuse Can Mask Antisocial Personality Disorder

Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is not fully understood. However, statistical evidence points to a possible correlation between ASPD and substance abuse. One study concluded that 40 to 50% of individuals with a substance abuse disorder meet the criteria for ASPD, while roughly 90% of those diagnosed with ASPD also have a co-occurring substance abuse disorder (Messina, Wish and Nemes, 1999). What Is Antisocial Personality Disorder? According to Psychology Today, “antisocial personality...

ADHD and Morphine Abuse

As one of the most common disorders in the United States, ADHD affects numerous individuals. Even if the disorder has been diagnosed and is being treated, those with ADHD can find themselves having difficulty functioning on a normal level in many areas of life. The stress and pressure of handling this disorder can eventually wear on individuals, making them more likely to seek relaxation through drug use. ADHD and Morphine Abuse Some people with ADHD turn to morphine to help calm their...

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